If you don’t want to be middle class

If you don’t want to be middle class
What can you be?

There’s no other path
There’s no other road

You can give away your money
Or you can become middle class

The middle class have their territory
They can annex the land they want

They can put the working class behind a concrete wall
That stretches across the land

The middle-class leader will do this
To protect his golden calf

What do you do if you don’t want to be middle class
Where can you go?

Can you wander the land in sackcloth and ashes?
Like a prophet with something to say

To do this is to risk your life
To do this is to be resented

What can you do, where can you go
Is there anywhere – a classless society

Author: blackbird212012

I am interested in multimedia work: songwriting, art, and creative writing. I have been involved also in theatre and music performances.

6 thoughts on “If you don’t want to be middle class”

  1. I am curious what’s your definition of the middle class? Because if you classify as a working-class blue-collar workers, they may be as well middle class by the common middle-class definition. What’s yours?

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    1. What is a blue-collar worker? Anyway here is a good example of perhaps the upper-middle class.
      George Osborne, the recently promoted editor-in-chief of the London Evening Standard, and the former chancellor of the exchequer is upping sticks, and relocating to the picturesque, not to mention high society, Somerset town of Bruton.
      Mr Osborne has had an offer accepted on a £1.6 million Georgian home, long considered one of the most desirable in the town. The five-bedroom, late 18th century, grade II listed house is set in three acres of grounds. When he arrives, he’ll be just another illustrious resident, joining the ranks of theatre producer Sir Cameron Mackintosh, artist forward-slash film director Sam Taylor-Johnson and fashion maven Alice Temperley.
      The upper class, of course, live in palaces.

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      1. Maybe, I misunderstood you twice :). You were mentioning the working class as an opposite to the middle class. Granted, you do not need to know that in the US, people debate a lot (or at least they did before the pandemic) what does a middle class mean. Does it mean income only or some other “attributes.” According to multiple polls, up to 85% of Americans consider themselves to be a middle-class :). Which you can filter by lower-upper, etc. And when a “working class,” you can say, blue-collar workers, people in manufacturing jobs, can say about themselves that they belong to the middle class, it is considered to be an indicator of a good economy. Regardless of that :), many of then indeed consider themselves belonging to the middle class.
        My apologies for a wordy reply :). It just surprised me, because, by the US standards, even I am considered to be an upper-middle-class,

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        1. It’s just my own perspective, no sociology study or anything. Growing up in the 1950’s you could tell the difference when the middle class were noted for pinstripe suits and bowler hats and the working class struggled to make ends meet. its no so easy now to seperate the classes because everyone wears casual wear to work, at home, to the theatre, on the beach, at football matches, on TV, everywhere, T-shirted and bejeaned are the norm, I bet even the Queen wears them on her day off. (put smiling Bowler Hatted Emoji here if you can find one).

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          1. I understand that! It was very funny, actually:). I was born and raised in a presumably “classless” society. It was not classless, in fact, but I didn’t have the above-said presumptions:)

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