The Volcanos of New Zealand

Auckland Field (New Zealand: 36.90S, 174.87E).
Auckland Field is a volcanic field with evidence of volcanic activity in the past 2,000 years

Mount Egmont (for John Percival, Second Earl of Egmont ((1711-1770)) (New Zealand: 39.30S, 174.07E).
Mount Egmont (8,261 ft. /2,518 m.) also known as Tananaki, is a stratovolcano that began forming over 70,000 years ago. Radiocarbon dating indicates eruptions from at least 3050 B.C. to 1500, with tree rings dating more recent eruptions in approximately 1655 and 1755.

Kaikone (New Zealand: 35.30S, 173.90E).
Kaikone – Bay of Islands (1,273 ft. / 388m.) is a volcanic field with indication of volcanic activity in the past 2,000 years.

Kaokohe-Bay of Islands (New Zealand: 35.30S, 173.90E)

Maroa (New Zealand: 38.42S, 176.08E).
Maroa (3,793 ft. / 1,156 m.) is a composed of calderas which have likely experienced volcanic activity in the past 2,000 years.

Mayor I. (New Zealand: 37.28S, 176.25E).
Mayor Island (1,165 ft. / 355 m.) is a Holocene shield volcano with no record of eruptions in historic time.

Okaataina (Maori oka, “to prick,” taina, “younger sibling”) (New Zealand: 38.12S, 176.50E).
Okataina (3644 ft. /1,111 m.) includes the Haroharo caldera and the Haroharo and Tarawera rhyolite dome complexes. The earliest recorded eruption occurred in 1886 from fissure vent Tarawera (Maori tara, “peak,” wera, “hot”), when 153 people died, buried by ash. All but six were Maoris. Four lost their lives in a 1903 eruption, and two in that of 1917. Most twentieth-century eruptions come from Echo Crater of Waimangu (Maori wai, “water”, mangu, “black”). The most recent eruption occurred in 1973.

Reporoa (Maori repo, “swamp”, roa, “long”) (New Zealand: 38.42S, 176.33E).
Reporoa (1,942 ft. /592 m.) is a caldera with likely volcanic activity in the past 2,000 years.

Rotorua (Maori roto, “lake”, rua, “second”) (New Zealand: 38.08S, 176.27E).
Roturua (2,484 ft. /1,757 m.) is a Pleistocene caldera with geysers.

Ruapehu (Maori rua, “hole,” “chasm,” pahu, “drum”) (New Zealand: 39.28S, 175.57E).
Ruapehu (9,174 ft. /2,797 m.) is an andesite stratovolcano and is the tallest mountain on North Island. The earliest recorded eruption occurred in 1861, but radiocarbon and ash layer datings indicate four eruptions before this; the first in approximately 7840 B.C. Since then there have been over 50 eruptions recorded, most recently in September of 1995. Although there was no eruption, 151 died in 1953 when the summit crater lake drained following the collapse of an ash barrier retaining it. A mudflow swept away part of Tangiwi Bridge just before the arrival of the Wellington-Auckland express. The locomotive, tender, and five cars plunged into the river.

Rumble I (New Zealand: 35.50S, 178.87E).
Rumble I (-3610 ft. /-1,100 m.) is one of five volcanic centres on White Island. There is evidence of activity in the last 10,000 years, but no record of historic eruptions.

Rumble II (New Zealand: 35.43S, 178.65E).
Rumble II (-2,890 ft. / -880 m.) is one of five volcanic centres on White Island. There is evidence of activity in the last 10,000 years, but no record of historic eruptions.

Rumble III (New Zealand: 35.74S, 178.48E).
Rumble III (460 ft. / -880 m.) is one of five volcanic centres on White Island. It is the most active volcano on the island with recorded eruptions in 1958, 1963, 1970, 1973 and most recently, in 1986.

Rumble IV (New Zealand: 36.22S, 178.05E).
Rumble IV (-1,480 ft. / -450 m.) is one of five volcanic centres on White Island. There is evidence of activity in the past 10,000 years, but no record of historic eruptions. Fumaroles have been detected at Rumble IV.

Rumble V (New Zealand: 36.14S, 178.05E).
Rumble V (-3,610 ft. / -450 m.) is one of five volcanic centres on White Island. There is evidence of activity in the past 10,000 years, but no record of historic eruptions. Fumaroles have been detected at Rumble V.

Taupo (Maori, “cloak”) (New Zealand: 38.82S, 176.00E).
Taupo (2,494 ft. / 760 m.) is a caldera. Radiocarbon datings reveal around 25 eruptions from approximately 9850 B.C. through 180 A.D., with ash layer dating showing a later eruption in A.D. 210. New Zealand was still uninhabited then, so there were no casualties. Although there was no eruption, 63 perished in 1846 when a mudflow destroyed the village of Te Heu Heu, a famous Maori chieftain.

Tongariro (Maori tonga “south wind,” riro “to come away”) (New Zealand: 39.13S, 175.64E).
Tongariro (6,487 ft. /1,978 m.) is a compound stratovolcano composed of several volcanic cones. The volcanic centre is largely composed of four andesite massifs: Kakaramea, Pihanga, Tongariro and Ruapehu. The Ngauruhoe (Maori nga, “the,” uru, “descendants,” hoe, “paddle”) is the youngest vent and the most active volcano in New Zealand. The earliest recorded eruption occurred in 1839. There have been nearly 70 eruptions since then, most recently in 1977.

Whale I. (New Zealand: 37.52S, 177.18E).
Whale Island (1,142 ft. / 348 m.) is a Pleistocene fumarole complex volcano with no record of eruptions in recent time.

White I. (New Zealand: 37.52S, 177.18E)
White Island (1,053 ft. / 321 m.) is the summit of two overlapping stratovolcanoes. The subject of Maori legends, the earliest recorded eruption occurred in 1826. There have been over 35 eruptions since then, making it one of New Zealand’s most active volcanoes. In 1914 an avalanche of debris killed 11 sulfur workers, although no actual eruption occurred then. The most recent eruption took place in June of 1995.

From the book: The Volcano Registry by Harris M. Lentz III